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Pendleton AICF Blankets

Since 1995 Pendleton has sponsored scholarships to attend tribal colleges in Washington and Montana. The Pendleton Endowment Tribal Scholars has also been founded and funded by Pendleton Woolen Mills to provide scholarships in perpetuity for Native students attending college throughout the United...

Pendleton Heritage Blankets

Pendleton has a line of blankets that they refer to as their Heritage Collection, the Pendleton blankets are old blanket designs which Pendleton brings back from it's history. Occasionally one of these blankets are retired and another is issued, the lineup as it exists today is 6 blankets as indi...
The Chief Joseph blanket is the most enduring of the today.  The Chief Joseph blankets were introduced in the 1920's and is still being woven today.  The blanket pays homage to one of the Northwest's Nez Perce most famous warriors Chief Joseph. Pendleton Chief Joseph Blanket The Nez Perce occupi...
Pendleton blankets have become a standard throughout the world for wool blankets and fabrics. Pendleton Woolen Mills uses 100% Merino wool to fabricate it's wide array of blankets, clothing and fabrics. When you purchase a Pendleton blanket you are acquiring an item that will last a life tim...
Late in the 18th century as Europeans were pushing further into North American continent they traded blankets to the Native Americans. These first "trade" blankets were woven in England and imported into the Americas by the Hudson Bay company. The only other blankets available at that time were w...
April of each year Pendleton Woolen Mills release their new blanket patterns, this year is no different. Below you will see a few of  the new patterns of Pendleton blankets that we will be carrying . Pendleton New West by Levi's Made and Crafted This blanket is a collaboration between Levi and Pe...

Indian Trade Blankets

Prior to the white mans push into the western Unites States, Native Americans would use animal hides for much of their clothing and to protect themselves from the elements. Some time in the 17th century the Navajo began producing wool textiles for wearing themselves and trading to other Native Am...